Professor Gort

Flying Saucer History from the Robot who Knows It Best!

6 notes

Artist’s Conception of Nash-Fortenberry Sighting, 1952 (by Joe Kutula)



On the evening of July 14, 1952, the flight crew of a United Airlines DC-4 reported one of the most intriguing aerial encounters of the flying saucer era. Captain William B. Nash and First Officer William H. Fortenberry—both World War II veterans trained in the identification of enemy aircraft—claimed they saw eight reddish-orange circles flying in echelon formation over Chesapeake Bay. They said the objects flew between their aircraft and the ground, which allowed them to estimate the discs’ size and speed. Nash and Fortenberry calculated that the objects were about 100 feet in diameter, about 15 feet thick, and were moving at approximately 12,000 miles per hour.
Image: True Magazine, October 1952,  via UFOPOP

Artist’s Conception of Nash-Fortenberry Sighting, 1952 (by Joe Kutula)

On the evening of July 14, 1952, the flight crew of a United Airlines DC-4 reported one of the most intriguing aerial encounters of the flying saucer era. Captain William B. Nash and First Officer William H. Fortenberry—both World War II veterans trained in the identification of enemy aircraft—claimed they saw eight reddish-orange circles flying in echelon formation over Chesapeake Bay. They said the objects flew between their aircraft and the ground, which allowed them to estimate the discs’ size and speed. Nash and Fortenberry calculated that the objects were about 100 feet in diameter, about 15 feet thick, and were moving at approximately 12,000 miles per hour.

Image: True Magazine, October 1952,  via UFOPOP

Filed under UFO flying saucer history unexplained 1952 1950s aviation United Airlines

29 notes

Santa Catalina Island UFO, 1947
Another early piece of photographic evidence from the 1947 wave of UFO sightings, this one purportedly shows one of six discs seen flying over Santa Catalina Island, California, on July 9, 1947. Three visiting Army veterans reported the sighting. One of them, a former aerial photographer named Bob Jung, snapped the photo. 
Photo via AboveTopSecret

Santa Catalina Island UFO, 1947

Another early piece of photographic evidence from the 1947 wave of UFO sightings, this one purportedly shows one of six discs seen flying over Santa Catalina Island, California, on July 9, 1947. Three visiting Army veterans reported the sighting. One of them, a former aerial photographer named Bob Jung, snapped the photo. 

Photo via AboveTopSecret

(Source: professorgort)

Filed under UFO flying saucer history 1947 California unexplained black and white

21 notes

professorgort:

Artist’s Depiction of the Kenneth Arnold Sighting (Coronet Magazine, November 1952)
Forget for a moment that the guy in this picture doesn’t look anything like the real Kenneth Arnold. It’s still a great example of saucer-era pop art. By the time Coronet magazine published this image and its accompanying article, “Flying Saucers: Myth or Menace?” in late 1952, the Kenneth Arnold sighting was more than five years old. By then, many Americans were at least somewhat familiar with the story. Arnold claimed that on the afternoon of June 24, 1947, as he was flying his private plane to Yakima, Washington, he spotted something strange: a formation of bright objects moving south between Mount Baker and Mount Ranier. The next day a newspaper reporter in Pendleton, Oregon, wrote up the story and sent it on to the Associated Press. Soon people around the country were talking about the “saucer-like objects” that Arnold had reported seeing. It didn’t matter that Arnold had never used the word “saucer” to describe the objects he saw. The term “flying saucer” was now embedded in the national lexicon.
Image via UFOPOP

professorgort:

Artist’s Depiction of the Kenneth Arnold Sighting (Coronet Magazine, November 1952)

Forget for a moment that the guy in this picture doesn’t look anything like the real Kenneth Arnold. It’s still a great example of saucer-era pop art. By the time Coronet magazine published this image and its accompanying article, “Flying Saucers: Myth or Menace?” in late 1952, the Kenneth Arnold sighting was more than five years old. By then, many Americans were at least somewhat familiar with the story. Arnold claimed that on the afternoon of June 24, 1947, as he was flying his private plane to Yakima, Washington, he spotted something strange: a formation of bright objects moving south between Mount Baker and Mount Ranier. The next day a newspaper reporter in Pendleton, Oregon, wrote up the story and sent it on to the Associated Press. Soon people around the country were talking about the “saucer-like objects” that Arnold had reported seeing. It didn’t matter that Arnold had never used the word “saucer” to describe the objects he saw. The term “flying saucer” was now embedded in the national lexicon.

Image via UFOPOP